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of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the sa; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice president: the clerk will call the names of the next group. the clerk: mr. cardin of maryland. mr. carper ofelaware. mr. casey of pennsylvania. mr. corker of tennessee. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice pre
in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
-- and told history of the united states. it draws on archival findings and recently declassified documents. it examined everything from the cold war to the fall of communism, continuing through to the obama administration. this is a trailer for the miniseries. >> i want to make it as exciting as it can be. history is an interesting subject. we want to report what actually happened. you cannot just except what is handed down. this is the key to the whole series, is to find out how we got to where we are. it is a great, great story. >> that was the trailer for "the untold history of the united states." it will air on monday evenings at 8:00 p.m. and is available on demand. oliver stone joins us here in new york, and we are joined by his co-author, peter. we welcome you both to "democracy now." oliver stone, you have been working on this for years, and be announced to people. why? >> it was apri big job for need. i have been working on it for four and a half years. i recently discussed wallace and the bomb at one of his glasses and we ended up talking for about an hour, hour-and-a-half. walla
on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all deciding that a war that was being more or less successfully waged in another c
by the united states on mexico. i thought so at the time when i was a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign. grant, of course, during the time of the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. and i just found this a really nothing quote and that's what i took it for my title. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico is somehow wicked. one thing that a toddler in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war which was not about war by any means, from being really enthusiastic and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning against the war. and i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happened in 1847 is a consensus really across the board, people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all this, that a war was
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the vice president: the chair lays before the senate one certificate of appointment to fill an unexpired term and the certificates of election of 33 senators elected for six-year terms beginning on january 3, 2013. all certificates, the chair is advised, are in the form suggested by the senate or contain all the essential requirements of the form suggested by the senate. if there be no objection, the reading of the certificates will be waived and they will be printed in full in the record. if the senators to be sworn will now present themselves at the desk of four as their names are called in alphabetical order, the chair will administer the oath of office. the clerk will read the names of the first group. the clerk: miss baldwin of wisconsin. mr. barrasso of wyoming. mr. brown of ohio. ms. cantwell of washington. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will suppor
or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? i do.ndistinct conversations >> congratulations, senator. [indistinct conversations] [laughter] >> okay. [indistinct conversations] >> will you pull that back a little bit? >> you have to pull back so we can see the most important part of this team. please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? >> i
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
on the united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution to the jurisprudence is his renowned commentary on the constitution. eminently quoted joseph story famously incorrectly declared, quote, a constitution of government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation and of quote. this lecture series celebrates the legacy into law. prior to the joseph story lectures have been and judge robert bork, professor john harrison at the university school of law, judge raymond randolph of the united states court of appeals for the d.c. circuit, and last year chief justice of the united states court of appeals for the sixth circuit. tonight we are honored to have a fifth name to the prestigious list as we welcome justice anthony kennedy who will deliver this evening's joseph story distinguished lecture on the topic, t
created in your image, a unit of god's grace, unprecedented, a repeatable and irreplaceable. we play -- pray for your blessing. with out it we will see only what the eye can see. we will see that we're created in your image, whether brown, black, or white, male or female, first-generation immigrant american or daughter of the american revolution, gay or straight, rich or poor. we pray for your blessing. without it we will only see scarcity in the midst of abundance. with your blessing we will recognize the abundance of the gifts of this good land with which you have and out of this nation. we pray for your blessing. bless all of us. privilege to be a resident of this nation with a. of gratitude in humility that we may be a blessing. we pray that you will shower with your life giving spirit, that will be leaders of this land, especially barack our president and joe our vice-president. fill them with righteousness that they may serve this nation ably and be glad to do your will. endow their hearts with wisdom and forbearance so that peace may prevail with righteousness, and justice wit
active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several times ago actually issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really look at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so it's kind of an ongoing project, and is in a host of different context, another talk by specific context, but this people, people civilly committed for mental because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups to actually address and raise the due process concerns about civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind incarceration, and why, what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so, aside from the campaign to end overincarceration, the aclu likes of the campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop the use of solitary or at least significantly curb its use. we've been very active the last se
ever bless the united states of america. [applause] >> the united states marine band. my country tis of thee sweet land of liberty if thee i sing land where my fathers died lad of the pilgrim's pride from every mountain side let freedom ring ♪ let music sweel the beach and ring from all the trees sweet freedom songs let silence break the sound prolonged ♪ our father guide to thee father of liberty to thee we sing ♪ long may our land be bright with freedom's holy light protect us by the might great god, our king ♪ >> pwow. our next distinguished guest is the appellate issue will share with us where -- poet who will share with us words he has composed for this location. occasion. >> one today. one sun rose on us today kindles over our shores greeting the facves of the great lakes acrossng a simple truth the greatplains rooftops, aking upf under each one a story told by oiur silten gestures my face, your face millions of faces each one yawning to life crescendoing to our day the pencil yellow school buses, for it stands, oranges betting our praise. sobered trucks and heavy with
, wicked, jekyll & hyde all getting together at the end of this month raise money for the united way. >> bill: good for them. good for them. thank you dan. yes, indeed, an historic day at the white house. i got out of my sickbed to go down for the announcement in the east room. president obama coming out at 1:10 and announcing the final two members of the national security team. last week he nominated john kerry, a great choice to be secretary of state. yesterday, he presented to the world his next two picks. >> obama: to help meet the challenges of our time, i'm proud to announce my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel for secretary of defense and john brennan for directorror of the central intelligence agency. >> bill: the president was adamant in his praise of hagel who the president befriended when he was a member of the senate traveled with him to iraq and afghanistan, got to know him as independent centrist moderate, republican. and was willing to stand up to the leaders of his own party and say they were wrong. originally voted for the war in ir
science positions every year in the united states cannot be filled by available american workforce positions. and i have positions that need to be filled so that our technology industry can continue to thrive. simply put, u.s. based companies have a great need for those trained in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. but at least right now there are not enough americans trained and ready to fill these jobs. we cannot continue to simply hope that american companies do not move operations to countries where they have greater access for individuals trained in these s.t.e.m. fields. we cannot continue to ignore this problem. it's that simple. continued in action -- especially since the american enterprise institute has confirmed 100 foreign-born workers with s.t.e.m. degrees create an average of 262 additional jobs for nativeborn workers. let me tell you, these countries would love to have the american educated ph.d's and other highly educated individuals return and boost their economies. not only from their acquired skills, but also by creating these new jobs as well.
too much of obama he says because in the united states, we subscribe to the quote, unquote myth of the imperial presidency. other transformational democratic presidents such as fdr and lbj, rockman says, have substantial democratic majorities in both the senate and in the house to enact their landmark legislation. obama in contrast has had to work with a narrow democratic majority in the senate and with an opposition party, the republicans in control of the house for the two years since january 2011. well, what about ronald reagan? president of the united states two successful four-year terms. on the domestic front, he enacted a major economic recovery package followed by an overhaul of social security. and in his second term, reagan gained a major tax reform. on the defense front, republican president reagan again with the help of the rity presided over a major increase in the defense budget, congress presided over a major increase in the defense budget, the defe including straby millions of protesters here and abroad. also commander in chief reagan gained secret aid for freedo
and the government is getting violent. the united states is getting involved. they're threatening to take control of the entire country. the militants' move prompted france to take action over the weekend. they put boots on the ground and went all in, bombing rebel training camps and other targets. so what will the united states do? a pentagon official told me this afternoon that the u.s. will participate in mali, but, and i want to make sure i put quotes around this, it's still deciding what that looks like. when we went to the mali border last summer, i saw first hand how dangerous the situation is. today, we spoke to some of our sources on the ground, including the military commander of the al qaeda's linked group. he told us that the militants are, in his words, excited and would welcome u.s. troops on the ground. he also said the french bombs have killed civilians and that france is signing a death warrant for french people around the world, opening the gates of hell. omar said the militants will fight to the end and this will be a long war, more dangerous than afghanistan or iraq. we also s
. it provides opportunities for residents on either sides of the border. united states border, mexican border. when we provide that, things start falling into place. you see a reduction in crime, reduction in drug use. that's what this discussion today and we thank simon increasing for putting the fund is so important because it allows us to move forward and some of the things i think you heard and discussed, we need to increase or border infrastructure and implement a firm but fair immigration policy. we need to encourage more u.s. cities and mexican city partnerships to allow us to facilitate that trade discussed earlier. earlier in 2011, 2013, las cruces named the champion of change because we were able to show why in the southwest we've been able to increase profit and personnel in a tough and challenging time. during that time, we listened to many officials to me upon the best ration and the president said he wanted to increase trade with mexico. but that type of mandate and this type of forum, you'll see more and more trade with mexico. i appreciate you all coming out today. we eagerly
to vip members of congress and the official program which was a history, also has a history of the united states capitol inside plus the program of events, of course, on the public inauguration day, which is monday. you can see it right here. it's really, really quite beautiful. >> it's gold. gold glitters here. >> it's gold. >> the honor of your presence is requested at the ceremonies attending the inauguration of the president and vice president of the united states. >> the guy we were just talking about. he'll be here, you'll be here, i'll be here. >> tomorrow we'll be here, sunday we'll be here, monday lots of live coverage coming up. history unfolding and we're thrilled to be here. thanks very much for joining us. we'll see you back here tomorrow. read us as well. "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >>> next, breaking news. cnn has learned an american has been killed during the hostage situation in algeria. plus the man who says he's behind the attack has the nickname "the marlboro man" and "the jihad prince." >>> the number of american husband holds with guns is on the decline
homes. because of the demand in housing . all of a sudden into the congress of the united states of the says we are going to put the full faith and credit of the united states of america on a 90-day leash. we are going to take the greatest economy in the greatest country, with the greatest responsibility in the world and we are going to put them on a 0-day leash. . how does a great country respond on a 90-day leash? we know what happened the world saw this happened. we got downgraded in the credit rating. that drove up the cost of borrowing in the united states. that drove up the borrowing cost of corporations. that drove up the costs of counties and cities that we represent. and we're told again that should we falter on the credit debt of the united states, that we can expect a downgrade and we can expect a further downgrade in cities and counties all over the country. and somehow we're supposed to believe this is a good plan. what this plan does -- can i have three additional minutes? mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman two additional minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gent
at the ceremonies attending the inauguration of the president and vice president of the united states. >> the guy we were just talking about. he'll be here, you'll be here, i'll be here. >> tomorrow we'll be here, sunday we'll be here, monday lots of live coverage coming up. history unfolding and we're thrilled to be here. thanks very much for joining us. we'll see you back here tomorrow. read us as well. "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >>> next, breaking news. cnn has learned an american has been killed during the hostage situation in algeria. plus the man who says he's behind the attack has the nickname "the marlboro man" and "the jihad prince." >>> the number of american husband holds with guns is on the decline but the nra's power is growing. it is growing even after newtown. breaking news, one american has been killed in the algeria hostage situation. we'll tell you what we know about that man and the other americans we are aware of tonight. let's get straight to jill dougherty at the state department. first, jill, what can you tell us about the american who died? >> there are not a l
that opened up hope for six and a half million people. the problem is the united states has never been very good, whether it's in afghanistan, iraq, in creating an alternative and the bol line is the united states basically walked away when it came to how do you create a new state, how do you facilitate the diverse forces, whether it's the tribal elements, more than 300 militias that had formed during that brief eight-month involvement, how do you stem the flow of weaponry and create an alternative. if you saw charlie wilson's war, at the very ending of the movie when he says i raised all this money, billions of dollars for arms to the opposition to fight off the soviets but i couldn't raise a couple of million dollars for education. it's the same kind of problem. we're not good at figuring out what alternatives are and as a result libya destabilized and a lot of the arms that went into libya, a lot of the forces that were militarized flowed not just into mali and algeria but across a huge chunk of northwest africa. as a result you see a huge destabilization that's affect in turn little tun
that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal. all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> the presidential inauguration is getting under way right here on the capitol, and we have a front row seat. >> here on the national mall, people are staking out their spot to experience this moment in history. >> the sun rises on barack obama's second term. >> we gather because we have chosen hope over fear. unity over purpose. >> on this day, a public celebration of the presidency after a private oath the day before. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> on this capitol where so many battles have been fought and will be fought, political rivalries are being set aside in a show of democracy and unity for all the world to see. >> and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >>> we're live here on the west front of the united states capitol for one of the grandest celebration
. [inaudible] there is a lot of sacred stuff going around in the republican party. they need to be more united and they are not. the american people elected the same people over and over and over. until that stops i don't know how americans are going to move forward. another comment i wanted to make too is that, talking about the left-wing media, that is correct. there is the hannity show -- it doesn't help. >> host: robert costa his comment that there is back and forth behind the scenes that we don't know but? >> guest: the 2012 election house republicans lost a lot of seats but there was no rebellion within the caucus in the internal leadership to break with cantor, boehner or mccarthy, the top three. the only real race he saw was for conference chairman cathy mcmorris-rodgers represented from washington who ran against tom price a representative from georgia for the number four spot. cathy mcmorris-rodgers beat out prices of former chairman of the republican study committee a conservative group in the house so you saw that level the fourth ranking level some fighting. boehner kantian mccart
,000 unnecessary deaths each year in the united states by using what's called a.e.d.'s, which are automatic external defibrillators. this is now allow -- this has now allowed people to be trained to save lives. this act was very important and i'm glad that it was signed as my bill. the fifth one that i'm very proud of that president bush signed is dealing with asthma conditions. self-administration of medication was prevented in schools because they had no drugs allowed and so many children had asthma and they needed epy pen or -- epi pen or abeauty rol, and if it wasn't available they could go into asthma attack. this bill allowed that-tsh these nurses and people at schools to have this type of treatment. the sixth one is the protection of lawful commerce in arms act. it was signed by president george w. bush october 26, 2005. it basically provided civil liability action, protection for companies who are manufacturing, distributing, or imported firearms or ammunition for damages that caused cities and states was suing the manufacturer. it was nuisance suits and i'm glad president bush sign
, talk to me after you got on the stage in front of the president of the united states and hundreds of thousands to sing the national anthem in 40-degree weather. until then, that particular bomb is bursting in air on the ridiculist. that's it for us. thanks for watching. "erin burnett out front" starts right now. >>> "outfront" next, weeks after newtown, another shooting at an american school as two gunmen open fire at a texas college. we go to houston for the latest. >>> plus the family of an american hostage murdered in algeria spoke out today. >>> beyonce's national anthem. what you may not have known about it. about it. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, a shooting at a texas campus. shots rang out at the lone star community college in houston today in what officials now are blaming on a fight between two people. it was pretty awful to watch. it was so much uncertainty today as we started to see just what those helicopter shots, people running, there were stretchers. no one was sure what was happeni
, the government of the united states under the constitution is a limited government and the constitution is to protect the people from the government, not for the government to give people rights and powers that the government then, in turn, could take away. on the other hand, the constitution does give broad powers to the federal government but it separates them among branches and between the states and the national government. the framers believed these structures would adequately control the government so as to protect individual liberty. but the american people disagreed. they believed that the constitution gave the federal government so much power that it could be tyrannical and violate individual rights. so as a condition of ratification, they demanded and received assurances that a bill of rights would be added to the constitution. now, each of those rights, including the second amendment dealing with guns, was adopted to yet further limit government power and to protect individual rights. in other words, the people that wrote the constitution in 1787, in the spirit that they beli
of questions already are coming from the united states about the algerian government's tactics in the operation that could have put the hostages in jeopardy. now, we also want to let you know that right now, there's a chartered flight en route of bp employees from algeria. it is headed towards london to gatwick airport. now, that could be landing at any moment. we don't yet know if the passengers are any of the freed hostages or if there are americans on board, but as we get that information, we're going to share that with you. the brother of an irish national who escaped from captivity had a harrowing story. he spoke to cnn today and described what happened to his brother. >> yeah, but just found out recently that he'd been mered to sleep with duct tape over his mouth and his hands tied and then we find out how he got free and five out of the compound or to a different part of the compound, and there were five jeeps and the algerian army had bombeded the jeeps and out of the five jeeps, the bomb had wiped out four of them. and they had obviously lost their lives, but lucky enough for my brothe
of people thought that was in possible. how could we do that? nobody had been in orbit yet in the united states. what kind of rockets are we going to build to be given to do it, and what is the main principle? he was going to build a big spacecraft but we didn't have a rocket to go in. we needed to lift the spacecraft that would do everything. take people up, go to the orbit, land, a comeback and then back into the ocean again. it was a monster. so he needed a rocket for the 1970's. so we had one to carry the injection and the other to carry the big spacecraft until somebody said we met. if we look at what we want to do, which is to get a man on the moon and bring him back, let's look at the settlements of this instead of a spacecraft to do everything. >> 100 years from now -- i'm just throwing a question and i will go back to this -- that you touched on something hundred, 200 years from now or we going to look back at the space program and say how primitive. in the 200 years, where to go from here from new york come to london, how advanced is this thing going to get? >> time will tell o
at that united states anti-doping agency report, it says that there were 38 blood samples taken from lance armstrong between 2009 and 2011 when he was making that comeback in the tour de france, and it showed blood levels with values with the likelihood of occurring naturally in less than 1 in a million. so a great deal of questions will be raised as lance armstrong continues to assert that he rode those last two years cleanly. there's a great deal of speculation about that. erin? >> thanks, ed. now i want to bring in our penl. david epstein is a senior writer for "sports illustrated." dana jacobson is with cbs sports and paul callan is our legal contributor. you were all critical last night. you didn't feel satisfied. let me ask you, did you feel that -- did he win you another tonight? >> no. and i said earlier there's probably no way he could have won me over. maybe i saw a little more human side when his kids were mentioned. he was -- oprah said do you owe people an apology and he listed the people he owes an apology to, and he didn't do it last night when he had a chance. he didn't do
swear. >> i do solemnly swear that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. g> four years after making history by becoming the first african-american president, barack obama kicks off the second term on martin luther king day. today and inauguration day special. we will air highlights from last ides' peace ball including naacp president benjamin jealous. >> the challenge for our country is never to see the day when a person of color would be president, nor the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to have -- happen again and again. >> we'll also hear from the legendary poet son the sanchez, ralph nader, sweet honey and the rock, and angela davis. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential agenda. >> we will look at big money behind the inauguration. four years ago president obama refused to accept corporate donations, but this year exxonmobil, at&t, christoph are among the biggest backers of today's festivities. -- microsoft are among the biggest backers of today's
was the real 12th president of the united states. >> chris taylor is in charge of what he calls the world's smallest presidential library. a tribute to the 24 hours the late senator from missouri spent as president david rice atchison. it's a nanosecond in history. also etched into atchison's grave stone. a great little asterisk, except almost universally historians say atchison was never president. >> it's a con seat, actually. atchison used to joke about it, atchison's term had come to a conclusion as well. he didn't take his oath of office either as a senator or president, in case of emergency they would have turned to the incoming president, zachary taylor. >> reporter: without twitter, facebook or cnn, news of emergencies travelled a lot slower in 1849. so there was no reason to explore the power vacuum at the time. in fact, atchison slept most of the day, tuckered out bay lot of last-minute business in the senate, some things never change. still, some of atchison's friends reportedly could not resist. >> that night, some of his colleagues in the senate woke him up in the middle of t
of congress, all of the supreme court, really the entire united states government is all together and it's awfully exciting. you can be happy or sad with the election results but it is awfully exciting. all of this is in the constitution, the 20th of january. in this case the 21st, the oath of office, the 30 words that the president says. that is i think part of it is a celebration of america. it is a celebration of our traditions. shepard: indeed it is and the first lady walking in or will be just shortly here. chris, i know you have some presidential historians there with you. i wonder what your sense is for what this day means as far as marking, setting the tone for the next four years? >> yeah. we're trying to get our presidential historian in. he is somewhere in the office. but jay winnick. obviously will be enormously important to see what this president has to say. it is interesting, i talked with david plouffe, one of the president's senior advisors yesterday he sent kind of a double message. on the one hand he said we need common ground that republicans and democrats coming toge
happened. >> there is no exam for being a united states senator. >> it is a matter of tricking enough voters. >> the bar is in the ground. >> what an amazing day two on the failure to unearth the conspiracy of how to lie to the american people. >> he is like a human whack-a-mole. ron johnson gets too close to him and your brain cells die. this is like the legacy of ron johnson. he attributes the warming of the earth to sun spots to gee logical spots of time. he is convinced that there is a conspiracy and there is none there. nor is it with hillary clinton saying it doesn't matter. he is obsessed with you know, he is obsessed with suspects who are no longer being examined and we know who did it. but he is following vapor trails to nowhere. >> i thought marco rubio did well i wondered if ron johnson was part of a one-two punch. he was going to really try to be -- men al migitry. >> it was striking to me. the sense of and this is bipartisan. the sense of paranoya anxiety that permeates every discussion of america's roll e in the worl and foreign policy. you would think we are consumed by
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for giving me the privilege of representing that beautiful and diverse city in the congress of the united states. each of us here today is truly a representative. a representative in the truest sense of the word. to represent the highest hopes and aspirations of the american people. on new year's eve, some of you, a large number of members of congress joined hundreds of people at the national archives building where we observed at midnight the 150th anniversary of the signing of the emancipation proclamation. at midnight there was an enactment of harriet tubman ringing the bill, ringing the bill. and as she rang the bell she said, now we are free. it was quite an incredible moment. and it was one that ushered in what president lincoln would call a new birth of freedom. for his era and for generations to come. that transformative moment in our history is a reminder of the best traditions we have as a people. the ability and obligation of each generation of americans to renew the promise of our founders. to carry forth the torch of progress. to reignite the american dream. this is who we ar
and it comes amid a bitter debate over gun control in the united states. just yesterday in his inaugural address, the president appeared to link the debate to the founding principles and the constitution. >> we have always understood that when times change, so must we. that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges. that preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action. >> "outfront" tonight, hogan gidley, republican strategist. michael waldman, former speech writer for president clinton and michael avlon. obviously that was a reference, a rather oblique one, to the gun control debate, but a reference it appeared to be. the fourth school shooting, though, in more than a month. nearly half the american people disapprove of what the president is doing on gun control. is it time now for less talk and more action from the president on gun control? >> well, you're right, that in that powerful speech yesterday, he used the words and the sentiments of the founders to argue for his agenda and one of the elements obliquely, though not exp
of the president of the united states. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> preserve, protect and defend. >> preserve, protect and defend. >> the constitution of the united states. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> thank you, mr. chief justice, thank you so much. [ applause ] >> thank you, sweetie. >> hey. thank you. i did it. all right. thank you, everybody. >> the president hugging his wife, the first lady, and his daughters, malia and sasha after taking that oath. he's going to do it again, he'll take the public ceremony oath and give his second inaugural address tomorrow, he's only the 17th president in u.s. history to make a second address. >> president obama followed the swearing inned to today with a wreath-laying ceremony and the martin luther king jr. memorial. vice president joe biden was also sworn if for his second term in office. >> the ceremony took place this morning at the naval observatory, which was th
personnel, ready for this event. we have snipers on the roofs. we have biological and chemical units prepared to deal with whatever comes up. we have a high degree of surveillance. satellites zooming in on the mall, as well as hundreds of surveillance cameras, to watch potential suspects. as one official told me last night, we have no specific threat. but we have to be ready for anything, george. >> and i know they've been preparing for this for a year. they've been locking the buildings on the parade route. they've been locking the garbage cans on the parade route. repaved the road. they are taking no chances. we have an incredible team of presidential savvy with us this morning. i want a quick word from two of them sitting with us here. let's start with matthew dowd, contributor to abc news. you have contributed to a combine, as well. both sides of the aisle. what does it take for a president to take a second inauguration and make it soaring? >> well, it's a much different situation when you go from the first to the second. the first one, everybody's filled with hope. we can make c
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